Since Frisco was established in 1902, no log cabins were ever in the City, but this is a replica of log cabins that were in the area before the City’s formation. This cabin honors those early pioneers who first plowed the rich soil of the Black Land Prairie of which Frisco is a part. It is representative of the way the early pioneers lived. Cabins of this type were a means of providing shelter from the elements. They were sparsely furnished as the pioneers had little in the way of comfort items. The door usually faced south to let in light and to mark the passage of time. One of the earliest recollections of a Log Cabin in this area was written by Joe Rogers, son of Clayton Rogers, in 1933 when he was 82 years old. Clayton Rogers and his wife came to the Frisco area in 1847 from Tennessee and built a log cabin just north of present day Frisco. The Rogers’ cabin was 15 feet square and made from hewn logs and assembled with pegs as they had no nails. It had a stick and dirt chimney, dirt floor, and a rawhide door. Joe Rogers describes the earliest method of lighting—tallow dip—that was used before candles. Tallow dip was made by taking a piece of cloth rolled tight, like a cigar, then melting some beef or mutton tallow and placing it in a vessel of some kind. The cloth wick was placed in the tallow and then burned. The table in the cabin has a facsimile of what this may have looked like. The rope bed is an example of the type of bedding they may have used.

Log Cabin

Log Cabin

Log Cabin

Log Cabin

Log Cabin Interior

Log Cabin Interior

Log Cabin Interior

Log Cabin Interior

Log Cabin Interior

Log Cabin Interior